Sitting in God's assigned seat

Linda Krieg’s journey back to Papua New Guinea was an adventure that she knows 'God had planned all along.'

Linda Krieg says she just knew people were praying. She was on her way back to Papua New Guinea and the smoothing of what could have been troubling circumstances made her suspect God was at work.

In all, there were five airports, some strict luggage weight restrictions and several complex issues in seating that could have made her journey a nightmare. But instead, things just kept neatly falling into place.

As her journey progressed, Linda began to wonder, “What is the Lord working toward?”

After four changes of preliminary seating on one flight, when she at last found her seat, God’s travel plan suddenly became very clear to her.

She was finally seated in a row with a mother and her 4-month-old baby, with the seat between Linda and the young mom piled high with baby paraphernalia, blankets and pillows.

Striking up a conversation with the young woman, Linda shared that her trip involved Siawi Bible translation and the upcoming dedication of the Siawi Bible.

Linda writes that suddenly her row-mate’s face broke into a huge smile.

“Oh, the Lord sent you to me! I need someone to pray for me and for my baby,” she said. The young mother shared her heart and her problems and her need for prayer. “Can you pray for me right now?” she asked Linda.

After prayer together, Linda says the remaining 11 hours of flight allowed good times of sharing and encouragement. She didn’t sleep much of that time, but her bulkhead seat allowed her to get up and down and prop her feet against the wall to reduce swelling and blood pooling--complications which could possibly occur due to her recent knee replacement.

In the end, Linda arrived safely in Papua New Guinea with not a doubt in her mind: God, in His wisdom, had assigned her airline seat on that flight.

And she knew He would also be accompanying her the next day as she began to work with Siawi co-workers on some Old Testament passages.

The Siawi New Testament is paid for, but you can help provide translations for other people groups. Each gift of $35 pays for not only one verse, but the materials to help people learn to read and understand it.